Samsung's Gear VR returns with a motion controller

about X hours ago from
Samsung's Gear VR returns with a motion controller

While there was no shortage of new Samsung hardware, the company's MWC showcase also had a new Gear VR headset to show off, with a new controller. Adding motion input (as well as a few more buttons) lets you navigate and interact with VR content without having to paw at the headset's buttons like we had to do previous iterations. Alongside a clickable touchpad, there's a trigger, home, back and volume keys. The controller also has an accelerometer, gyrometer and magnetic sensors built-in, and the new hardware will work with Galaxy S7, S7 Edge, the Note 5, as well as the Galaxy S6 series.

Valve promises more realistic audio for VR

about X hours ago from
Valve promises more realistic audio for VR

Most of the effort in improving virtual reality focuses on the visuals. But what about audio -- isn't it jarring to hear sound that clearly doesn't mirror the world you're in? Valve thinks it can fix that. It just released a Steam Audio kit that lets developers provide more immersive sound in games and apps, particularly for VR. On top of producing binaural audio (reflecting how your body affects listening), it has a particularly advanced, physics-based approach to generating sound effects.

Six Flags' new VR roller coaster is both breathtaking and broken

about X hours ago from
Six Flags' new VR roller coaster is both breathtaking and broken

Imagine screaming through deep space, swerving through the wreckage of exploding starships in a high-octane scene plucked straight out of a science fiction movie. Suddenly the universe stops, frozen in time as your body continues to hurl through the void at high speed. Your stomach churns at the realization that it's moving but, somehow, the world around you isn't. That's what happened to me this weekend on Six Flags' Galactic Attack -- a virtual reality roller coaster, available at Six Flags' two California parks, that broke halfway through my ride. Twice.

Our first look at the Nintendo Switch and 'Breath of the Wild'

about X hours ago from
Our first look at the Nintendo Switch and 'Breath of the Wild'

The Nintendo Switch is finally here, along with its most anticipated launch title, The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. We're still putting the new console through its paces, but we've put together a quick preview of the hardware and game to tide you over. In short: We're impressed. But the lack of networking functionality, among other features, so close to the console's launch has us worried if Nintendo is totally prepared. Check back for our full review of the Switch and Breath of the Wild next week.

The Morning After: Weekend Edition

about X hours ago from
The Morning After: Weekend Edition

It's been a banner week for Nintendo fanboys and girls, what with the company's new console finally making its way into reviewers' hands -- and giving Nintendophiles their first extended look at the Switch. Naturally, Engadget editors were among the chosen to get some quality time, and early returns are ... middling? Devindra Hardawar is a fan of the system's controllers, and he loved the ability to take the Switch out of his living room and into bed for late-night gaming sessions. But that portability is seriously hamstrung by a screen that's essentially unusable outside and meager battery life (at least when playing Zelda: Breath of the Wild).

PSA: That Razer esports sponsorship email is a scam

about X hours ago from
PSA: That Razer esports sponsorship email is a scam

So, you stream your gameplays and recently received a lucrative sponsorship offer via email from popular esports platform Team Razer. Exciting, right? Unfortunately, it's nothing but a scam -- that email is actually from a cyber criminal and not a "scouting agent." Team Razer has sent out a notice that scammers are using its brand name to spread malicious software.

'Halo' will bring back local multiplayer

about X hours ago from
'Halo' will bring back local multiplayer

When I critiqued Halo 5: Guardians, the lack of split-screen co-op was low on my list of gripes with the game. But that's not to say it wasn't a problem. In the lead-up to the 2015 game's release, developer 343 Industries crowed that there were no sacred cows on the road to hitting 60 FPS in the campaign mode -- including the local co-operative play that'd been a part of the series since 2001. That's changing, though. "I would say for any [first-person shooter] going forward we will always have split-screen," 343's head Bonnie Ross said recently at the DICE summit in Las Vegas, according to Polygon.

Everything you don't want to know about the Nintendo Switch

about X hours ago from
Everything you don't want to know about the Nintendo Switch

Being a Nintendo fan is often an exercise in managing expectations. For years, we've watched the company just miss the mark with online services, third-party game availability and outdated hardware specifications. The frustration of seeing a company you like make so many odd decisions can wear you down. Now, Nintendo is about to release a new game console, and as always, it's far from perfect. For the most loyal Nintendo fans, these imperfections can evoke one of two responses: anger that the company has failed to live up to their expectations, or denial that the company is doing anything wrong at all. That's no way to live. Instead, let's skip the first four stages of grief and embrace the Nintendo Switch's faults with acceptance. This is everything the Nintendo Switch is doing wrong at launch (so far).