Valve: Steam gets 75,000 complaints a day, so be patient

about X hours ago from
Valve: Steam gets 75,000 complaints a day, so be patient

Steam, sure, everyone loves Steam, but there's something about Valve's overall lack of transparency that just rankles. Independent developers have called the platform a "big black box," and users often talk about the service's glacially slow customer service. Which is why Valve has issued something of a mea culpa, promising to do better at dealing with issues in the future and opening up about the task it faces.

The next 'Dots' game is completely different, except for the dots

about X hours ago from
The next 'Dots' game is completely different, except for the dots

Dots, the studio behind a beautifully-designed series of mobile games (including Two Dots and last year's Dots & Co), just announced its next game: Wilds. As the title suggests, this game will be a departure from what the studio has produced thus far -- it's the first game that doesn't have the word "dots" in its title. And the announcement game via an odd, enigmatic video that shows a lone figure in the middle of a dark forest, dancing amidst trees and glowing orbs. Those orbs surely resemble the dots that you must connect in the studio's other puzzle games, but there's no other hint as to what players can expect when Wilds arrives.

The Strong Museum's latest addition digs deep into gaming history

about X hours ago from
The Strong Museum's latest addition digs deep into gaming history

Video games are a unique, nascent art form and it makes sense to preserve them. While efforts by the Internet Archive have been underway for a while, it hasn't been a priority for the gaming industry to archive their own products. Most archival projects happen thanks to the unpaid efforts of super fans bent on saving their beloved gaming experiences. Today, though, The Strong Museum, also known as the National Museum of Play, announced that Scott Adams, the developer behind 1978's text adventure game Adventureland, has donated a ton of materials from his long career in the industry.

You can fix the HTC Vive's sub-par headstrap on June 6th

about X hours ago from
You can fix the HTC Vive's sub-par headstrap on June 6th

Despite hitting the market before the Oculus Rift with motion control, room-scale virtual reality support and more connectivity options, the HTC Vive has always trailed behind Facebook's VR headset in one incredibly important regard: comfort. The Vive's basic headstrap works fine, but compared to the more robust mounts on the Rift and PlayStation VR headsets, it's objectively inferior. It's a good thing, then, that the company's new Deluxe Audio Strap is almost ready for consumers -- HTC says Vive owners will be able to nab the more ergonomic head-mount accessory on June 6th.

Facebook is serious about playing games on Messenger

about X hours ago from
Facebook is serious about playing games on Messenger

Facebook has rolled out plenty of games on its Messenger platform over the years, but it's ready to deploy even more. Today, the company has announced that it's expanding the reach of Instant Games to even more users around the world. Additionally, the company is now ready to launch the richer gameplay features it first announced at F8 a couple of weeks ago. Think: turn-based games, leaderboards and tournaments. Depending on the title, you could even see the occasional "game bot" pop up to either cheer you on or notify you of additional options.

'Minecraft Education Edition' will let kids build with code

about X hours ago from
'Minecraft Education Edition' will let kids build with code

Minecraft Education Edition is getting a big upgrade: Codebuilder. Essentially, students will be able to learn coding by traveling around the game's pixely world. Typing "/code" will bring up a list of commands and code snippets. From there, an adorable robot avatar dubbed "the agent" appears and acts on code to do things like work while you're away, lighting your fortress at night, or delving deeper into the earth for resources. On the stage, the agent built a windmill and columns for the Parthenon automatically. And that's about it! Codebuilder is available in beta right now.

Valve has no more 'Half-Life' writers left

about X hours ago from
Valve has no more 'Half-Life' writers left

Marc Laidlaw's departure from Valve last year was a shock. The author was responsible for single-handedly writing both Half-Life and Half-Life 2, and worked as the story lead on the latter's two episodic sequels. Chet Faliszek and Erik Wolpaw, co-writers on Half-Life 2: Episode One and Episode Two, stuck around however, meaning some of the series' writing talent still remained at Valve.