'Zelda' concert tour to celebrate 'Breath of the Wild'

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'Zelda' concert tour to celebrate 'Breath of the Wild'

If you love The Legend of Zelda, or appreciate top video game tunes, there's nothing like a Symphony of the Goddesses performance. The live, orchestral concert series has dazzled fans of Link and Hyrule for the past five years, with epic renditions of classic tracks from A Link to the Past, Ocarina of Time and more. Today, concert organiser Jason Michael Paul Entertainment has announced the dates for the 2017 Tour. It's also teased some set list changes, including a new piece from Breath of the Wild, an "all-new movement" from Skyward Sword and an updated overture.

'D&D Beyond' takes the pen and paper out of tabletop RPGs

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'D&D Beyond' takes the pen and paper out of tabletop RPGs

Despite all the newfangled ways one can play Dungeons and Dragons, there's something special about playing it the old fashioned way -- in person with a bunch of friends and a geometrical mess of dice. Still, if you want to modernize your tabletop adventure just a little, you'll have the option soon. Wizards of the Coast just announced that it's working with Curse to create an official digital toolset designed to replace the pen and paper character sheets of yore.

PlayStation Now will bring PS4 games to your PC

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PlayStation Now will bring PS4 games to your PC

You could soon play PlayStation 4 exclusives like Uncharted 4 and The Last of Us Remastered on your PC. Sony is bringing the PS4 catalog to its streaming game service PlayStation Now, the company said today in a blog post. The announcement is light on details, but we know that every game in the service, including PS4 games, will be part of a single PS Now subscription. Sony is holding a private test in the next few weeks, and said it will share more information closer to launch.

The Morning After: Monday, March 13th 2017

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The Morning After: Monday, March 13th 2017

Welcome back. While our team out in Texas continues to struggle against wave upon wave of BBQ and beers at SXSW, they're also finding time to bring us all the cool stuff worth talking about. SXSW is a weird one, and we've already seen specialized VR chairs, sound-based motion capture and a Levi- and Google-made smart jacket. Meanwhile, on the other side of the world, Fukushima might be safe enough for people to return.

PlayStation VR horror title lets friends mess with your game

about X hours ago from
PlayStation VR horror title lets friends mess with your game

Most solo virtual reality games don't make for great entertainment at parties... not unless your definition of fun involves making everyone wait their turn. Firesprite, however, has a way for your friends to join in. Its upcoming PlayStation VR sci-fi horror title The Persistence will include a mobile companion app that lets nearby friends see the game map. Your pals can make your life easier by steering you toward items, or create havoc by running you toward threats -- this is one of the few horror games where the people on your couch may be as much of a hazard as the virtual enemies.

'Breath of the Wild' creators explain how they bucked tradition

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'Breath of the Wild' creators explain how they bucked tradition

The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild isn't just the series' best game in years, it's also unlike any title in the series -- it's an open-world experience where you're free to find your own solutions to challenges. But just how did Nintendo manage to pull off such a radical change in direction? Don't worry -- it's happy to explain. The Game Developers Conference has posted a talk from Nintendo's Hidemaro Fujibayashi, Satoru Takizawa and Takuhiro Dota that describes how the Breath of the Wild team broke from the highly linear experiences of past Zelda games. It's a textbook example of how to make a good open-world game regardless of the genre.

This company can track motion with sound instead of light

about X hours ago from
This company can track motion with sound instead of light

When it comes to tracking physical objects in virtual spaces, pretty much every company is relying on light in some form. Oculus and HTC have their light mapping sensors, while Sony's PlayStation VR relies on infrared for its motion tracking camera. Hauoli, a young Austin-based startup demoing at SXSW, has something different in mind. It's developed a way to track virtual objects with sound. It's entirely software based and works with just about any speaker, so it also removes the need for expensive motion tracking hardware.