The Cavs and Warriors will have their own 'NBA 2K eLeague' teams

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The Cavs and Warriors will have their own 'NBA 2K eLeague' teams

The inaugural season of the NBA's "2K eLeague," featuring eSports teams owned by NBA franchises, is looking more promising now than when it was announced in February. Today, the NBA revealed that 17 of its 30 teams will participate in the eSports competition, which it created in partnership with Take-Two Interactive (developer of the NBA2K series) and is scheduled to begin in 2018. Earlier this year, the league had said it only expected about 12 NBA teams to join the project, but clearly it managed to get many more of them interested before launch.

'Titanfall' returns to mobile as a real-time strategy game

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'Titanfall' returns to mobile as a real-time strategy game

Titanfall 2 might not have been the runaway success Respawn was hoping for, but it has a tight-knit community that love its parkour movement and robot-on-robot warfare. Now, with the help of Nexon and Particle City, the franchise is getting a strategy spin-off called Titanfall Assault. Details are scarce, but the pair is promising fast, real-time player-versus-player combat. You'll be commanding a mixture of pilots and titans, upgrading a virtual "deck" that features both soldier types and tactical, match-shifting Burn Cards along the way. Victory will help you climb the game's leaderboards and presumably unlock cards to tackle higher-ranked foes.

Steam Gifting changes crack down on code resellers

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Steam Gifting changes crack down on code resellers

Steam has announced a few big changes to its Gifting process, and they could sound good or bad, depending on your stance. It's putting the Gift to E-mail and Gift to Inventory options out to pasture, replacing it with a system that directly exchanges games from buyer to receiver. It's most likely an action taken to curtail grey market trades, since resellers tend to buy several copies during sales to sell over time. However, that might also make it impossible for collectors to get old and rare titles. You can at least send gifts months in advance, though, in case you want your friend to receive the game on a special day.

Valve: Steam gets 75,000 complaints a day, so be patient

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Valve: Steam gets 75,000 complaints a day, so be patient

Steam, sure, everyone loves Steam, but there's something about Valve's overall lack of transparency that just rankles. Independent developers have called the platform a "big black box," and users often talk about the service's glacially slow customer service. Which is why Valve has issued something of a mea culpa, promising to do better at dealing with issues in the future and opening up about the task it faces.

The next 'Dots' game is completely different, except for the dots

about X hours ago from
The next 'Dots' game is completely different, except for the dots

Dots, the studio behind a beautifully-designed series of mobile games (including Two Dots and last year's Dots & Co), just announced its next game: Wilds. As the title suggests, this game will be a departure from what the studio has produced thus far -- it's the first game that doesn't have the word "dots" in its title. And the announcement game via an odd, enigmatic video that shows a lone figure in the middle of a dark forest, dancing amidst trees and glowing orbs. Those orbs surely resemble the dots that you must connect in the studio's other puzzle games, but there's no other hint as to what players can expect when Wilds arrives.

The Strong Museum's latest addition digs deep into gaming history

about X hours ago from
The Strong Museum's latest addition digs deep into gaming history

Video games are a unique, nascent art form and it makes sense to preserve them. While efforts by the Internet Archive have been underway for a while, it hasn't been a priority for the gaming industry to archive their own products. Most archival projects happen thanks to the unpaid efforts of super fans bent on saving their beloved gaming experiences. Today, though, The Strong Museum, also known as the National Museum of Play, announced that Scott Adams, the developer behind 1978's text adventure game Adventureland, has donated a ton of materials from his long career in the industry.