The colorful Strix Fusion headset can blink in sync with others

about X hours ago from
The colorful Strix Fusion headset can blink in sync with others

Imagine the following, if you will: with seconds on the clock, you sink the final, game-winning goal in a particularly frenzied Rocket League match. It's over. You've done it. And just like that, the lights on the side of your headset begins to pulse a brilliant violet, then an intense yellow, alternating, ebbing, flowing, before finally building to a vivid orange climax. Victory loves company as much as misery does, so the fact that your teammates' headsets have run through that chromatic celebration in sync with yours only makes your heart soar even higher. That's the (slightly silly) vision ASUS is selling with its new Strix Fusion headset here at its Computex RoG press event.

Intel’s Core i9 Extreme Edition CPU is an 18-core beast

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Intel’s Core i9 Extreme Edition CPU is an 18-core beast

Last year at Computex, Intel unveiled its first 10-core consumer CPU, the company's move into the world of a "megatasking." It was a pricey chip, launching at around $1,700, but it satisfied the needs for users who needed to juggle several intensive tasks at once. Now, Intel is upping the ante with a whole new family of processors for enthusiasts, the Core X-series, and it's spearheaded by its first 18-core CPU, the i9-7980XE.

NVIDIA 'Max-Q' gaming laptops are ultrabooks with GTX1080 power

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NVIDIA 'Max-Q' gaming laptops are ultrabooks with GTX1080 power

Based on NVIDIA's 2017 Computex announcements, PC gamers won't have to choose between bulky gaming laptops and desktop-level processing power for much longer. A new design it calls "Max-Q" is arriving in some 15 new laptops that it claims are both 3x thinner and 3x more powerful than their predecessors -- think 18mm thick, 5 pounds and with the power of NVIDIA's GTX1080 inside. Plus, there's "WhisperMode," which can pace the game's framerate to keep the laptop cool and quiet during a plugged-in gaming session.

PlayStation's E3 press conference is coming to a theater near you

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PlayStation's E3 press conference is coming to a theater near you

E3 might be officially open to the public this year, but what if you don't want to book a flight to Los Angeles just to get a taste of what it's like to be there? Sony, at least, has you covered: it's bringing back its PlayStation E3 Experience for the third year in a row. Score tickets (thankfully, they're free) and you can watch a broadcast of Sony's June 12th press conference in 85 theaters across the Americas, including in Los Angeles itself.

Alienware 15 review: Bigger, but not necessarily better

about X hours ago from
Alienware 15 review: Bigger, but not necessarily better

Getting your hands on a bleeding-edge gaming laptop is an exercise in chasing chip architecture. It's sort of a waiting game. You wait for Intel and NVIDIA to upgrade their GPU and CPU standards, you wait for early adopter manufacturers to put them through their paces and, finally, you wait for the machine you want to hit the market with the new bells and whistles. In spring, we saw Dell's Alienware 13 kitted out with Intel's new Kaby Lake Core i7-7700HQ CPU and NVIDIA Pascal graphics -- and now that same combo is available in the company's larger 15-inch notebook.

'Rime' creators will remove anti-tampering code if it's cracked

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'Rime' creators will remove anti-tampering code if it's cracked

Game studios that use digital rights management (DRM) tools tend to defend it to the death, even after it's been cracked. It prevents 'casual' piracy and cheating, they sometimes argue. However, Rime developer Tequila Works is taking a decidedly different approach. It claims that it'll remove Denuvo, the anti-tampering/DRM system on the Windows version of Rime, if someone cracks its island puzzle title. This is an odd promise to make, especially since it amounts to an inadvertent dare -- find a way to break in and the developers will eliminate the need for that crack.

Nintendo might not be done boosting Switch production

about X hours ago from
Nintendo might not be done boosting Switch production

It's no secret that Nintendo is facing a ton of demand for the Switch, to the point where it reportedly doubled production to keep up. Even that figure might be a tad conservative, however. The Financial Times' supply chain sources claim that Nintendo has hiked its Switch production to 18 million for its current fiscal year (which ends in March 2018), up 2 million from the Wall Street Journal's figures. Why? Allegedly, it's to prevent "customer tantrums" during the holidays -- Nintendo doesn't want to ship Super Mario Odyssey in November with no systems available to play it.

USB-powered Sega Nomad gives you near-endless game time

about X hours ago from
USB-powered Sega Nomad gives you near-endless game time

Sega's Genesis Nomad was always something of a compromise (it was running 16-bit console games on mid-1990s handheld tech), but the battery life was a particularly sore point: it took six AA batteries just to get 3 hours of play time. Wouldn't it be nice if you could use modern hardware to play without constant (and sometimes expensive) battery swaps? The Sega Holic (aka Catch22 on NeoGAF) thinks so. He just teased a homebrew Nomad modification that lets the portable system run on USB power. You could play for hours on end with the same external battery you use for your phone, or rely on your laptop's power to keep playing in between meetings.