'Wolfenstein II' blasts its way to the Switch on June 29th

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'Wolfenstein II' blasts its way to the Switch on June 29th

It's been a long time in coming, but the Nintendo Switch adaptation of Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus is (almost) here. Bethesda has announced that the Nazi-punching sequel will be available on June 29th for $60. You'll generally know what to expect, and that's likely to be a good thing. Panic Button's conversion appears to be on par with its well-received Doom port, with Switch-friendly motion controls and the kind of rich graphics detail you wouldn't expect from a portable console.

Hackers find an 'unpatchable' way to breach the Nintendo Switch

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Hackers find an 'unpatchable' way to breach the Nintendo Switch

Security researchers from ReSwitched have discovered a Nintendo Switch vulnerability that could let hackers run arbitrary code on all current consoles. Dubbed "Fusée Gelée" ("Frozen Rocket") it exploits buggy code in the NVIDIA Tegra X1's USB recovery mode, bypassing software that would normally protect the critical bootROM. Most worrisome for Nintendo is that the bug appears to be unpatchable and could allow users to eventually run pirated games.

'Starcraft II' finally gets a store for player-made maps

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'Starcraft II' finally gets a store for player-made maps

Newer Blizzard titles like Hearthstone and Heroes of the Storm are free to play, but they do offer as many paid extras as you can shake a stick at. That's normal these days, of course, but StarCraft II was first released in 2010 -- a simpler time when you tended to just buy a video game and play it. There have been many paid expansions and cosmetics added over the years, but Blizzard originally promised a marketplace through which the community could sell custom-made maps and take a cut of the revenue. This feature was first mentioned way back in 2009, before StarCraft II even launched, and nine years later it's finally debuting in the impending 4.3.0 update.

'Fortnite' is coming to China

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'Fortnite' is coming to China

The popular battle royale game Fortnite is coming to China, thanks to a partnership between its creator Epic Games and Tencent. The Chinese tech giant, which owns over 40 percent of Epic, will handle distribution and publishing. Tencent will reportedly spend $15 million on Fortnite in China on marketing to its domestic playerbase and clamping down on piracy and illegal clones, the latter of which is a problem in the country.

The first major 'PUBG' tournament takes place in Berlin this summer

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The first major 'PUBG' tournament takes place in Berlin this summer

Player Unknown Battlegrounds, aka PUBG, has been pushing its way to the eSports realm for quite some time now. While it has moved beyond the straight-up battle royale genre it popularized with new gameplay like War Mode, it's the behind the scenes tech that will have the most impact on the game's success as an eSport title, including its 3D replay systems and help from chipmakers like AMD. Now, according to a report from Polygon, PUBG's first major eSports tournament take place July 25th through the 29th.

'Super Mario 64: Ocarina of Time’ is the perfect Nintendo mashup

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'Super Mario 64: Ocarina of Time’ is the perfect Nintendo mashup

Super Mario 64 is considered to be one of the greatest video games of all time. Its large, imaginative levels and increasingly difficult challenges have defined the 3D platformer genre since its release on the Nintendo 64. Similarly, The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time — the first in the franchise with 3D graphics — is considered a classic with a record 99 rating on Metacritic. Both have been celebrated with portable re-releases and a deluge of fan movies, artwork and soundtrack remixes. But never have the two games been combined in a fan-made ROM hack like Super Mario 64: Ocarina of Time.

The best lightweight gaming laptops

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The best lightweight gaming laptops

Back at CES a few months ago, I wrote that we were entering a golden age in lightweight gaming laptops. It started last year with NVIDIA's small, power-efficient Max-Q graphics, followed by Intel and AMD's surprising team-up on Core H with Radeon RX Vega M graphics. Now Intel has ramped up the power further with its six-core, eighth-gen Core-i7 and Core-i9 portable processors. Over the past few months, a slew of lightweight gaming laptops using this tech have hit the market. But which ones are best? Let's take a look.