'My Tamagotchi Forever' app arrives on March 15th

about X hours ago from
'My Tamagotchi Forever' app arrives on March 15th

You ready to give a cute virtual pal some food, bath and TLC? If you miss your Neopets and Tamagotchi days, then keep an eye out for My Tamagotchi Forever, which will be available for Android and iOS devices on March 15th, 2018. Bandai Namco is bringing its beloved virtual pets to smartphones for their 20th birthday, and this time, they're no longer pixelated blobs asking for attention. In this new version, the pets looks more like the villagers in Animal Crossing and is even set in a town with other inhabitants they can make friends with.

Surprise! A bad mobile port of 'Chrono Trigger' is on Steam

about X hours ago from
Surprise! A bad mobile port of 'Chrono Trigger' is on Steam

Last year, Nintendo one-upped its NES Classic retro console with the SNES Classic, a powerful and value-packed trip back to the best of 90s gaming. But among all the gems bundled into the box, one was notably missing: Chrono Trigger. Out of nowhere, that exclusion was given a chance for redemption when the game appeared on Steam today. Unfortunately, a flood of negative reviews pointed out the truth: Apparently, the PC version appears to be straight-up ported from the 2011 mobile version.

Some 'Hearthstone' cards will be phased out with April's expansion

about X hours ago from
Some 'Hearthstone' cards will be phased out with April's expansion

Blizzard has solidified Hearthstone's annual flow of retiring old cards and welcoming new ones: For the third year in a row, a new expansion will come in April that signals a sea change in the digital card game. While we don't know the title or flavor of Hearthstone's next set, we do have a list of changes and new features that will arrive when 2017's Year of the Mammoth gives way to 2018's Year of the Raven.

'Into the Breach' is monsters, mechs and a reset for strategy games

about X hours ago from
'Into the Breach' is monsters, mechs and a reset for strategy games

Subset Games' 2012 space command simulator FTL wasn't the first roguelike indie game to come out during the subgenre's renaissance, but it stood out from the rest. Players guide their single ship against a galaxy of enemies, and the challenge and high skill ceiling earned legions of fans and financial success. Last February, the studio teased its second game, Into The Breach, a grid-based strategy game where the player's trio of mechs must fight off an invading onslaught of colossal bugs while saving as many people as possible. The game comes out today -- and anyone that loved the studio's tough-but-rewarding first game will be equally charmed by its sophomore release.

'Papers, Please' official short film recreates the game's bleak tone

about X hours ago from
'Papers, Please' official short film recreates the game's bleak tone

The official Papers, Please short film has been a long time in coming, but it's finally here... and if you're a fan of the game's grim Soviet Bloc atmosphere, you're in for a treat. The 11-minute production includes plenty of nods to the title's nerve-wracking customs checks, such as the dread you feel when you're not quite sure you should have let someone through. It also touches on the game's underlying theme -- how do you maintain some shred of humanity in a job that's frequently heartless? Be sure to turn subtitles on, by the way, as the dialogue is appropriately Russian.

Can legislation fix gaming's loot box problem?

about X hours ago from
Can legislation fix gaming's loot box problem?

Last year's gaming controversy has turned into this year's legislative battleground. Fans were outraged when Star Wars: Battlefront II launched with buyable loot boxes that unbalanced multiplayer combat, and other games like Need For Speed: Payback and Destiny 2 had their own pay-to-win controversies. Eventually, loot boxes unsettled enough constituents to rile their representatives. Legislators in Hawaii, Washington and Illinois have introduced bills to either study loot boxes or restrict access to young players, but how effective will they be? What else can lawmakers do?