Hands-on with Intel's Ghost Canyon NUC and Tiger Lake Xe laptops

about X hours ago from
Hands-on with Intel's Ghost Canyon NUC and Tiger Lake Xe laptops

2020 is clearly going to be a big year for Intel's gaming presence. The chipmaker is gearing up to introduce its first dedicated graphics hardware, dubbed Intel Xe. But at CES it also made some surprising announcements, like its new NUC "Ghost Canyon" that can fit desktop graphics cards, as well as the fact that it's breaking the 5GHz barrier with upcoming H-series 10th gen chips. For gamers, this all means one thing: It's going to be a very interesting year.

Razer's Kishi gamepad plugs into your phone for minimal latency

about X hours ago from
Razer's Kishi gamepad plugs into your phone for minimal latency

No, that's not a Razer Phone 3 in the photo, but it's a Pixel 3a XL wedged between two halves of a new Razer gamepad. Following the Junglecat, Razer chose CES to launch the Kishi controller, which plugs straight into your Android (via USB-C) or iPhone for lower latency and hence faster response. Obviously, this can be life or death in world of competitive mobile gaming, especially with cloud gaming being pitched as a growing trend in the 5G era. On a similar note, the Kishi provides passthrough charging at the bottom right side, so you wouldn't have to worry about battery life while busy shooting at enemies.

Razer built a compact modular gaming PC around Intel's new NUC

about X hours ago from
Razer built a compact modular gaming PC around Intel's new NUC

A bit earlier this week, Intel gave us an early look at its NUC 9 Extreme, the latest in a long and fascinating line of super-compact PCs. It's bigger than the NUCs (or Next Units of Computing) we've seen in the past, but that extra size means this is the first NUC to play nice with unlocked Core i9 CPUs and full-sized graphics cards. As it happens, that sort of performance and flexibility was enough to catch Razer's eye, leading it to build a tiny, modular gaming PC built around Intel's latest high-powered Compute Element. Say hello to the Tomahawk.

Tech that defined the decade

about X hours ago from
Tech that defined the decade

2020 is just around the corner, and another decade will soon come to an end. A lot has happened over the past ten years, and not all of it was pleasant: 3D television came and went, the headphone jack slowly died and the intersection of tech and politics frequently became front-page news. But amidst the downers, there was still plenty of groundbreaking tech that came about between 2010 and now that have made an impact in our lives. Here's a not-at-all-comprehensive list of a few of them.

2020 is VR's make-or-break year

about X hours ago from
2020 is VR's make-or-break year

In the nearly four years since the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive hit retail shelves, VR has gone from being the most exciting new computing medium around -- something that could be as transformational as the internet itself -- to a niche accessory for gamers with too much money. New headsets have come and gone, cheap mobile VR was briefly popular (before going extinct) and standalone virtual reality devices have finally arrived. It'd be wrong to say there's been no progress in the world of VR, but it still feels as if we're waiting for it to truly take off as a medium.

Our favorite games of 2019

about X hours ago from
Our favorite games of 2019

The end of 2019 is nigh, which means it's time for us to take stock of this year's crop of games. And it's been quite a year -- not quite the heights of 2017, to be sure, but still more than we here at Engadget can reasonably play between all the gadgets we review and events we attend. So rather than declare a list of winners, we'll tell you about the titles that captured our hearts and minds this year, the games of 2019 that made our days just a little better and will stick in our memories as we round the corner into the next decade and beyond.