Nathan Drake Doesn't Have A Health Meter In Uncharted, He Has A Luck Meter

about X hours ago from
Nathan Drake Doesn't Have A Health Meter In Uncharted, He Has A Luck Meter

One of the biggest ways players have to suspend disbelief in video games is when they must believe that their avatar can survive a flurry of bullets, hide behind cover, and be totally fine. That's the case in most games, but that has never been the case in the Uncharted series.

According Naughty Dog animator Jonathan Cooper, Nathan Drake never actually gets hit by more than one bullet before dying. While enemy soldiers and mercenaries shoot boatloads of ammo at him, the darkened, red-laced screen that emerges when Drake is "shot" multiple times actually represents his luck running out after having consecutive near-misses.

That’s a mega-swing! Sidenote I learned on joining the team: Drake doesn’t ever take bullet damage. The red UI that shows ‘hits’ is to represent his ‘luck’ running out. Eventually enemies will get a clear shot and kill him if he takes enough near-misses. https://t.co/byzVKYXVe7

Nathan Drake Doesn't Have A Health Meter In Uncharted, He Has A Luck Meter

about X hours ago from
Nathan Drake Doesn't Have A Health Meter In Uncharted, He Has A Luck Meter

One of the biggest ways players have to suspend disbelief in video games is when they must believe that their avatar can survive a flurry of bullets, hide behind cover, and be totally fine. That's the case in most games, but that has never been the case in the Uncharted series.

According Naughty Dog animator Jonathan Cooper, Nathan Drake never actually gets hit by more than one bullet before dying. While enemy soldiers and mercenaries shoot boatloads of ammo at him, the darkened, red-laced screen that emerges when Drake is "shot" multiple times actually represents his luck running out after having consecutive near-misses.

That’s a mega-swing! Sidenote I learned on joining the team: Drake doesn’t ever take bullet damage. The red UI that shows ‘hits’ is to represent his ‘luck’ running out. Eventually enemies will get a clear shot and kill him if he takes enough near-misses. https://t.co/byzVKYXVe7

Evo Heads Back To Japan Next February

about X hours ago from
Evo Heads Back To Japan Next February

The world's biggest fighting game event is gearing up for its second year in Japan.

The Evolution Championship Series (Evo), which hosts the biggest fighting game event of the year, will once again have its Japan-oriented rendition next February 15-17, this time in the city of Fukuoka, the tournament announced via Twitter.

EVO JAPAN is back! #EVOJapan2019 will be taking place in the city of Fukuoka, Japan from February 15 - 17, 2019. More details at #EVO2018 in August. We hope to see you there! pic.twitter.com/4cJKLuJZty

Evo Heads Back To Japan Next February

about X hours ago from
Evo Heads Back To Japan Next February

The world's biggest fighting game event is gearing up for its second year in Japan.

The Evolution Championship Series (Evo), which hosts the biggest fighting game event of the year, will once again have its Japan-oriented rendition next February 15-17, this time in the city of Fukuoka, the tournament announced via Twitter.

EVO JAPAN is back! #EVOJapan2019 will be taking place in the city of Fukuoka, Japan from February 15 - 17, 2019. More details at #EVO2018 in August. We hope to see you there! pic.twitter.com/4cJKLuJZty

See Three Games' Worth Of Out-of-Bounds Secrets In Latest Boundary Break Video

about X hours ago from
See Three Games' Worth Of Out-of-Bounds Secrets In Latest Boundary Break Video

Youtuber Shesez is back with another episode of his Boundary Break series, this time covering the Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy.

These videos always provide not only amusing images of stretched out characters and unused assets, but also some small insight into how games are made. The regular unused assets, characters floating right outside the places they're supposed to appear seconds later, and secret assets used as measuring sticks for other assets are all in effect here.

You can also see how most screens in the game are actually loaded into the world itself, and items that might be used simply to modify the in-game lighting. You can also see what exactly happens to Crash himself when he falls out of bounds and into his death.

See Three Games' Worth Of Out-of-Bounds Secrets In Latest Boundary Break Video

about X hours ago from
See Three Games' Worth Of Out-of-Bounds Secrets In Latest Boundary Break Video

Youtuber Shesez is back with another episode of his Boundary Break series, this time covering the Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy.

These videos always provide not only amusing images of stretched out characters and unused assets, but also some small insight into how games are made. The regular unused assets, characters floating right outside the places they're supposed to appear seconds later, and secret assets used as measuring sticks for other assets are all in effect here.

You can also see how most screens in the game are actually loaded into the world itself, and items that might be used simply to modify the in-game lighting. You can also see what exactly happens to Crash himself when he falls out of bounds and into his death.

Valve API Briefly Leaks Player Counts For Over 10,000 Steam Games

about X hours ago from
Valve API Briefly Leaks Player Counts For Over 10,000 Steam Games

Last week, Valve revealed it was working on a way for developers on its Steam storefront to have better access to player and sales numbers as a way to let them make more informed decisions. This week, we caught a brief glimpse into how much data Valve might actually have at its disposal.

Ars Technica reports that Valve's API, which organizes much of its information into a digestible format, was recently found to have a hole in its security that let common observers to gather very accurate data about how many players individual games on Steam had accrued.

While the numbers drawn from the API are extremely accurate, they don't account for every game; the parsed API uses developer-created achievements to reverse-engineer the number of players for a given game, which means only games with achievements (about 13,000 of the 23,000 games on Steam, according to Ars) show visible numbers. Though it's an incomplete data set, its numbers are the most accurate data we've seen for Steam games yet - more accurate than the old Steam Spy numbers.

Valve API Briefly Leaks Player Counts For Over 10,000 Steam Games

about X hours ago from
Valve API Briefly Leaks Player Counts For Over 10,000 Steam Games

Last week, Valve revealed it was working on a way for developers on its Steam storefront to have better access to player and sales numbers as a way to let them make more informed decisions. This week, we caught a brief glimpse into how much data Valve might actually have at its disposal.

Ars Technica reports that Valve's API, which organizes much of its information into a digestible format, was recently found to have a hole in its security that let common observers to gather very accurate data about how many players individual games on Steam had accrued.

While the numbers drawn from the API are extremely accurate, they don't account for every game; the parsed API uses developer-created achievements to reverse-engineer the number of players for a given game, which means only games with achievements (about 13,000 of the 23,000 games on Steam, according to Ars) show visible numbers. Though it's an incomplete data set, its numbers are the most accurate data we've seen for Steam games yet - more accurate than the old Steam Spy numbers.

Masashi Sakurai: Prize Money Competitions Not 'In Line' With Nintendo's Philosophy

about X hours ago from
Masashi Sakurai: Prize Money Competitions Not 'In Line' With Nintendo's Philosophy

When Nintendo debuted Super Smash Bros. Ultimate at E3 last month, it did so with an invitational tournament featuring top players from both the Super Smash Bros. Melee and For Wii U scenes. The tournament was part of Nintendo's growing acceptance for the competitive side of its fighting games, something it wasn't always so keen on. The reason for the company's reluctance in the past has been subject to much speculation, but Smash creator Masashiro Sakurai has shed some light on why that might be.

Speaking to The Washington Post in a recent interview, Sakurai opined about why the company was skittish about the idea of major Smash tournaments. "The philosophy behind them doesn’t go in line with Nintendo’s philosophy in that some of these players are playing for the prize money,” he told the Post. “It comes to a point where they’re playing the game for the money, and I feel that kind of direction doesn’t coincide with Nintendo’s view of what games should be.” Nintendo did not provide an official comment on its stance (Sakurai is not an employee of Nintendo; he is the founder of Sora Ltd., the developer contracted to create Ultimate).

Masashi Sakurai: Prize Money Competitions Not 'In Line' With Nintendo's Philosophy

about X hours ago from
Masashi Sakurai: Prize Money Competitions Not 'In Line' With Nintendo's Philosophy

When Nintendo debuted Super Smash Bros. Ultimate at E3 last month, it did so with an invitational tournament featuring top players from both the Super Smash Bros. Melee and For Wii U scenes. The tournament was part of Nintendo's growing acceptance for the competitive side of its fighting games, something it wasn't always so keen on. The reason for the company's reluctance in the past has been subject to much speculation, but Smash creator Masashiro Sakurai has shed some light on why that might be.

Speaking to The Washington Post in a recent interview, Sakurai opined about why the company was skittish about the idea of major Smash tournaments. "The philosophy behind them doesn’t go in line with Nintendo’s philosophy in that some of these players are playing for the prize money,” he told the Post. “It comes to a point where they’re playing the game for the money, and I feel that kind of direction doesn’t coincide with Nintendo’s view of what games should be.” Nintendo did not provide an official comment on its stance (Sakurai is not an employee of Nintendo; he is the founder of Sora Ltd., the developer contracted to create Ultimate).