Hands-On With Hearthstone's Rastakhan's Rumble

about X hours ago from
Hands-On With Hearthstone's Rastakhan's Rumble

Blizzards troll-themed Hearthstone expansion Rastakhan's Rumble is playable at BlizzCon 2018, so I dove in to a few duels . While these duels are an odd format - using single-player mechanics and cards from the new Rumble Run dungeon-crawl experince in a two-layer match format - they do demonstrate some of the new mechanics, characters, and cards admirably.

Of most importance are the game-altering shrines (these are not available in standard play and will be a large part of the Rumble Run). My rogue shrine allows all spells I play to be cast twice - my opponent has a mage shrine that adds one spell power for each spell card in hand(!). These effects are obviously way too strong for any kind of competive format, but are sure to make the new single-player content interesting. Shrines have health and can be destroyed, but they come back three turns after death, so balancing the life of a shrine over just smashing your opponent down presents players with an constant conundrum.

Eventually the match ended with me eating two enormous thirteen point fireballs to the face, but the mechanics in the expansion are shaping up to be fun. Overkill allows you to gain a special effect for doing more than a minions life in damage with cards that have it, and loa, spirits, and troll faction leaders all add a big dose of flavor.

Hands-On With Hearthstone's Rastakhan's Rumble

about X hours ago from
Hands-On With Hearthstone's Rastakhan's Rumble

Blizzards troll-themed Hearthstone expansion Rastakhan's Rumble is playable at BlizzCon 2018, so I dove in to a few duels . While these duels are an odd format - using single-player mechanics and cards from the new Rumble Run dungeon-crawl experince in a two-layer match format - they do demonstrate some of the new mechanics, characters, and cards admirably.

Of most importance are the game-altering shrines (these are not available in standard play and will be a large part of the Rumble Run). My rogue shrine allows all spells I play to be cast twice - my opponent has a mage shrine that adds one spell power for each spell card in hand(!). These effects are obviously way too strong for any kind of competive format, but are sure to make the new single-player content interesting. Shrines have health and can be destroyed, but they come back three turns after death, so balancing the life of a shrine over just smashing your opponent down presents players with an constant conundrum.

Eventually the match ended with me eating two enormous thirteen point fireballs to the face, but the mechanics in the expansion are shaping up to be fun. Overkill allows you to gain a special effect for doing more than a minions life in damage with cards that have it, and loa, spirits, and troll faction leaders all add a big dose of flavor.

Hands-On With Hearthstone's Rastakhan's Rumble

about X hours ago from
Hands-On With Hearthstone's Rastakhan's Rumble

Blizzards troll-themed Hearthstone expansion Rastakhan's Rumble is playable at BlizzCon 2018, so I dove in to a few duels . While these duels are an odd format - using single-player mechanics and cards from the new Rumble Run dungeon-crawl experince in a two-layer match format - they do demonstrate some of the new mechanics, characters, and cards admirably.

Of most importance are the game-altering shrines (these are not available in standard play and will be a large part of the Rumble Run). My rogue shrine allows all spells I play to be cast twice - my opponent has a mage shrine that adds one spell power for each spell card in hand(!). These effects are obviously way too strong for any kind of competive format, but are sure to make the new single-player content interesting. Shrines have health and can be destroyed, but they come back three turns after death, so balancing the life of a shrine over just smashing your opponent down presents players with an constant conundrum.

Eventually the match ended with me eating two enormous thirteen point fireballs to the face, but the mechanics in the expansion are shaping up to be fun. Overkill allows you to gain a special effect for doing more than a minions life in damage with cards that have it, and loa, spirits, and troll faction leaders all add a big dose of flavor.

Hands-On With Hearthstone's Rastakhan's Rumble

about X hours ago from
Hands-On With Hearthstone's Rastakhan's Rumble

Blizzards troll-themed Hearthstone expansion Rastakhan's Rumble is playable at BlizzCon 2018, so I dove in to a few duels . While these duels are an odd format - using single-player mechanics and cards from the new Rumble Run dungeon-crawl experince in a two-layer match format - they do demonstrate some of the new mechanics, characters, and cards admirably.

Of most importance are the game-altering shrines (these are not available in standard play and will be a large part of the Rumble Run). My rogue shrine allows all spells I play to be cast twice - my opponent has a mage shrine that adds one spell power for each spell card in hand(!). These effects are obviously way too strong for any kind of competive format, but are sure to make the new single-player content interesting. Shrines have health and can be destroyed, but they come back three turns after death, so balancing the life of a shrine over just smashing your opponent down presents players with an constant conundrum.

Eventually the match ended with me eating two enormous thirteen point fireballs to the face, but the mechanics in the expansion are shaping up to be fun. Overkill allows you to gain a special effect for doing more than a minions life in damage with cards that have it, and loa, spirits, and troll faction leaders all add a big dose of flavor.

Replay - MediEvil 2

about X hours ago from
Replay - MediEvil 2

MediEvil will rise from its grave in a PlayStation 4 remake next year, and if it's successful, we may see the sequel (which we are playing today) get the same treatment. If you're asking yourself "Hey, you should have replayed the first game instead," we already did that, and you can watch it right now!

MediEvil 2 was developed by SCE Cambridge Studio and released for PlayStation on April 30, 2000. Set 500 years after the events of the first game, Sir Daniel Fortesque returns to find he isn't the only dead being that lives again. He's quickly thrust into zombie-killing action, and even learns about Jack the Ripper. We take a look at the opening moments of this classic title, and shift gears a little for our second game, which impresses us more than it should.

Replay - MediEvil 2

about X hours ago from
Replay - MediEvil 2

MediEvil will rise from its grave in a PlayStation 4 remake next year, and if it's successful, we may see the sequel (which we are playing today) get the same treatment. If you're asking yourself "Hey, you should have replayed the first game instead," we already did that, and you can watch it right now!

MediEvil 2 was developed by SCE Cambridge Studio and released for PlayStation on April 30, 2000. Set 500 years after the events of the first game, Sir Daniel Fortesque returns to find he isn't the only dead being that lives again. He's quickly thrust into zombie-killing action, and even learns about Jack the Ripper. We take a look at the opening moments of this classic title, and shift gears a little for our second game, which impresses us more than it should.

Unboxing The Nintendo Switch Diablo III Bundle

about X hours ago from
Unboxing The Nintendo Switch Diablo III Bundle

Diablo III releases on Switch today, and to celebrate, Nintendo has also released a special edition Diablo III Bundle. The bundle includes the Switch system – including charcoal Joy-Cons, a standard Joy-Con Grip, and a special Diablo-themed Dock – as well as a Diablo III carrying case for the Switch and a full-game download code for Diablo III Eternal Collection for Switch.

We were sent the Nintendo Switch Diablo III Bundle, so we decided to snap some photos and show off how it looks. The carrying case is nice, and the art on the dock is good looking. However, having the art on the Switch unit itself relegated to the back is a weird choice. It's also disappointing to have the bundle come with the standard charcoal Joy-Cons and not have any special design on the Joy-Con Grip.

You can see our photos in the gallery below.

Unboxing The Nintendo Switch Diablo III Bundle

about X hours ago from
Unboxing The Nintendo Switch Diablo III Bundle

Diablo III releases on Switch today, and to celebrate, Nintendo has also released a special edition Diablo III Bundle. The bundle includes the Switch system – including charcoal Joy-Cons, a standard Joy-Con Grip, and a special Diablo-themed Dock – as well as a Diablo III carrying case for the Switch and a full-game download code for Diablo III Eternal Collection for Switch.

We were sent the Nintendo Switch Diablo III Bundle, so we decided to snap some photos and show off how it looks. The carrying case is nice, and the art on the dock is good looking. However, having the art on the Switch unit itself relegated to the back is a weird choice. It's also disappointing to have the bundle come with the standard charcoal Joy-Cons and not have any special design on the Joy-Con Grip.

You can see our photos in the gallery below.

Top Of The Table – Western Legends

about X hours ago from
Top Of The Table – Western Legends

Sandbox video games are one of the most popular styles of play for a good reason. By engendering player freedom, and encouraging a variety of activities, players feel tremendous agency over the unfolding story and action. That same sandbox approach has sometimes proven challenging to implement well in the tabletop gaming world, especially since board games almost always involve multiple players who must all be able to move through the same dynamic open world – a notoriously challenging problem to solve, in both tabletop and video game spheres. Luckily, there are more than a few standout successes in the board gaming world, and the recently released Western Legends stands tall among them. Tapping into the thrill of Old West shootouts, cattle wrangling, outlaw hunting, bank robberies, and more, Western Legends is as close as I’ve encountered to a definitive cowboy-themed board game. Whether you’re riding a high from the recent release of Red Dead Redemption 2, or you’re just a lifelong fan of the genre, Western Legends nails the fantasy.

Top Of The Table – Western Legends

about X hours ago from
Top Of The Table – Western Legends

Sandbox video games are one of the most popular styles of play for a good reason. By engendering player freedom, and encouraging a variety of activities, players feel tremendous agency over the unfolding story and action. That same sandbox approach has sometimes proven challenging to implement well in the tabletop gaming world, especially since board games almost always involve multiple players who must all be able to move through the same dynamic open world – a notoriously challenging problem to solve, in both tabletop and video game spheres. Luckily, there are more than a few standout successes in the board gaming world, and the recently released Western Legends stands tall among them. Tapping into the thrill of Old West shootouts, cattle wrangling, outlaw hunting, bank robberies, and more, Western Legends is as close as I’ve encountered to a definitive cowboy-themed board game. Whether you’re riding a high from the recent release of Red Dead Redemption 2, or you’re just a lifelong fan of the genre, Western Legends nails the fantasy.