Battlezone is playable without a VR headset next month

about X hours ago from
Battlezone is playable without a VR headset next month

Battlezone, a first-person tank-based shooter, was a launch title for PlayStation's VR system. It later came to the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive via Steam, but until now, it has not been possible to play it without a VR headset. Until now.

For more shooting and fewer questions, here are the best FPS games on PC.

Developers Rebellion have now announced Battlezone: Gold Edition, which includes the base game and all its additional content, and is playable without a headset. If you already own the base version of Battlezone, Gold Edition will be available as a free and automatic update.

Platinum never loses its lustre

about X hours ago from
Platinum never loses its lustre

There's a story I've heard passed around a few times over the years about PlatinumGames. It's about how, so industrious is this Osaka-based studio, it never really stops working; how its employees are put onto shift-work, one working through the day while the other toils away through the night, ensuring a never-ending 24-hour production cycle. It's a myth, sadly - though that's fortunate for the studio's 190-strong workforce, you'd figure - but like all myths there's surely a kernel of truth in there somewhere. How else to explain how the studio has produced some 14 games in just over a decade? How else to explain the exquisite craft that's almost always on show?

Maybe you'll find the answer in PlatinumGames' headquarters, spread over two floors of the Umeda Sky Building. It's not the tallest building in Osaka, but it's certainly the most ostentatious; built just before the economic bubble burst in late 80s Japan, it looks like a space invader squatting over the Osaka skyline, its two 40-story towers joined by an outrageous atrium that hangs high up in the air.

Rampage film review - even shallower than the arcade game

about X hours ago from
Rampage film review - even shallower than the arcade game

Last year, the New York Times ran a fascinating, faintly scary story about Hollywood's intellectual property crisis. Through the lens of one producer's desperate attempt to make a film out of the mobile game Fruit Ninja, the piece explored how the major movie studios' retreat from risk of any kind had led to a market where films were vastly more likely to get made if they had some kind of recognisable licence attached - even if that property featured no characters or obvious storytelling potential. Films were being made out of old board games, toy lines, even emojis.

This, I assume, is how we have ended up with a film based on Rampage. Bally Midway's 1986 arcade hit is a game of mindless destruction in which players control three giant monsters - an ape, a werewolf, a lizard - and scale and smash up skyscrapers, reducing them to rubble for high scores. It's a gleeful inversion of King Kong and Godzilla, and of the video games they inspired like Donkey Kong. It's fondly remembered and still fun to play today, but it's hardly a crown jewel of gaming intellectual property; it was revived in the mid-90s and limped through a few sequels before disappearing once again from our screens. And it is somehow now a major motion picture starring Dwayne Johnson.

PUBG 'Metal Rain' event has eight-player squads, flare guns and falling UAZs

about X hours ago from
PUBG 'Metal Rain' event has eight-player squads, flare guns and falling UAZs

This week's PUBG event, dubbed Metal Rain, takes us to Erangel, where eight-player squads (up to 12 squads in total) get to fight over flare guns hidden throughout the map's usual loot locations. And no, you won't be fighting with the flare guns, that would be silly. Instead, you'll use them to call down "heavily-armored UAZs". That's one in the picture above: they don't look like they'll blow up easily.