The Gamer's Post


The week's highs and lows in PC gaming

about X hours ago from PC Gamer
The week's highs and lows in PC gaming

Phil Savage: Avvar word
I'm relieved to hear that Chris likes Dragon Age: Inquisition – Jaws of Hakkon. DLC seems to be Bioware's most inconsistent output. You never know whether you're going to get a Citadel, or, god forbid, a Darkspawn Chronicles. Jaws of Hakkon may not be either, but a new zone with a strong through line is a fine thing to extend an already massive adventure. That it also ties into Inquisition's ace crafting system is no bad thing; and extra companion dialogue is an added bonus.

I do still hope at least some of Inquisition's future add-ons will more closely mirror the game's main missions. Its campaign quests are sumptuous things; each dramatically progressing the story and offering new and surprising objectives and plot progression. For now, Hakkon sounds like a strong start to Bioware's post-Inquisition plans.

Andy Kelly: Pillars of Nostalgia
Yesterday my review of Pillars of Eternity went live on the website. But while I often cast games aside once I’ve reviewed them, I’m still deep into this one. Now I can mop up all those side quests without worrying about a deadline looming over my shoulders.

Continue reading...

Toejam and Earl: Back in the Groove clears $500,000 on Kickstarter

about X hours ago from PC Gamer
Toejam and Earl: Back in the Groove clears $500,000 on Kickstarter

The Toejam and Earl: Back in the Groove Kickstarter actually nailed its $400,000 funding goal a couple days ago, but we decided to let it slide until everything was wrapped up, just to see how far it could get before the curtain fell. And it turned out to be surprisingly far: The final amount raised came to $508,637, enough to add on some old-school skins, more playable characters, and the Hyperfunk Zone. Imagine a world without the Hyperfunk Zone. The living would envy the dead.

"We went into this thinking we were just raising money to make a new game, and what we discovered is a tremendous connection with people; connections from past stories, from current passionate support and creativity, and future hopes and faith. This is the real gold. The best gifts are the ones you don't expect to get," the developers wrote in their message of thanks to backers. "So from here, we shift gears and collect ourselves and continue on with a new awareness that it's the journey in life that matters."

Continue reading...

Teenage Minecraft player admits to orchestrating three swattings

about X hours ago from Polygon News
Teenage Minecraft player admits to orchestrating three swattings

A 13-year-old boy confessed to the police that he initiated three separate instances of swatting across two states, reports Ars Technica.

The teenager, whose name has not been released because of his age, swatted a teacher and a classmate in Ventura County, California, according to the county's sheriff's department. He also swatted a rival Minecraft player located in Ocean City, New Jersey. Police traced the IP address used to place the VOIP calls in that incident to the boy's home in Camarillo, California, where they found phone spoofing software on a computer.

"He felt he was wronged," said Det. Gene Martinez of the Ventura County Sheriff's Department in an interview with Ars Technica.

Continue reading...

Valve says the Steam "Discovery Update" is working

about X hours ago from PC Gamer
Valve says the Steam

Valve made some big changes to Steam last summer with the "Discovery Update," which introduced curators—you can find our page here—recommendations, and other functionality designed to create a "smarter" digital storefront. The idea was to make it easier to find games, especially lesser-known titles, through more varied and individualized recommendations. And according to a message posted by Valve to the SteamworksDev group (via Reddit), those changes are working as intended.

"Prior to the Discovery Update, products only showed up to customers under specific circumstances; being manually featured by Valve admins, being present on top sellers/new release queues, or via direct search results," Valve explained in the post. "As a result of that limitation, we were able to highlight only a small selection of broadly popular titles that we knew would appeal to the majority of customers. That is no longer the case."

Previously, the "Main Capsule"—the large carousel on the front page of Steam—offered a mix of "manually curated titles, personalized recommendations, popular new releases, and top sellers," but could only show ten to 20 games per day to each user. Now, more than 4000 unique titles are shown every day, and clicks on the Main Capsule are up as well, from 21 percent of all clicks on the Steam home page to 25 percent.

Continue reading...

Impressions: Homesick

about X hours ago from Rock, Paper, Shotgun
Impressions: Homesick

Not quite walking Dear Esther, not quite Myst, Homesick‘s an extremely pretty first-person mood piece propelled by environmental puzzles. I think the unfinished version I’ve played has some big flaws, but I also think a lot of people are going to love it. My eyes certainly did. … [visit site to read more]

Continue reading...

Mad Max Wasteland Lore 101

about X hours ago from GameInformer Feature

During our trip to its Stockholm offices, Avalanche Studios worked to cultivate a sense of mystery about Mad Max’s Wasteland. For example, if you’re curious about where the Wasteland is on the globe, you may be out of luck. There are clues scattered throughout the canyons, caves, and deserts that point to what this desolate area may have been before the apocalypse hit, but it’s not something that’s spelled out for players. Today, we’re going to tell you as much as we can about the Wasteland itself.

We’ve talked about this before, but it’s important to note that the Wasteland isn’t a featureless expanse of tawny sand dunes or flatlands that extend as far as Max’s eyes can see. Avalanche was wary of that sort of visual monotony from the start. You won’t see trees, lakes, or vegetation, but that doesn’t mean you won’t see things that will make you want to hit the brakes, get out of the Magnum Opus, and take a better look. “That’s been a challenge,” says Emil Kraftling, senior design director. The team has worked to keep it from being a boring desert. “If you go to different wastelands in our world, they don’t look similar.” 

Continue reading...

What we learned about Firewatch: ghost stories, toilets and mental health

about X hours ago from Polygon News
What we learned about Firewatch: ghost stories, toilets and mental health

How hard is it to get lost in Firewatch? Not very, Campo Santo co-founder Sean Vanaman tells me, but I've done it all the same.

Take that not as a knock against the game, but more of a credit to my terrible, no good, very bad sense of direction.

Firewatch is the debut title from indie dev Campo Santo coming to Linux, Mac and Windows PC. It's a gorgeous exploration of isolation and choice, filtered through the lens of a man named Henry who takes a job as a fire lookout. In the wild, his only companion is his supervisor, a woman named Delilah that he interacts with via radio.

Continue reading...