The Gamer's Post


Texas city approves creation of The National Videogame Museum

about X hours ago from Polygon News
Texas city approves creation of The National Videogame Museum

After years of trying to find a home, the Videogame History Museum now has one: The Frisco, Texas Discovery Center, whose board has committed 10,400 square feet now and nearly $1 million to cover startup costs and construction of a larger facility to showcase its vast collection.

The board of the Frisco Community Development Corporation this week voted unanimously to approve the terms bringing the museum, founded by John Hardie, Sean Kelly and Joe Santulli, to the Discovery Center. The Museum will then be known as The National Videogame Museum.

The board also joined other travel and tourism authorities in donating $100,000 for startup costs, which the Museum founders have agreed to match.

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Mod of the Week: Doom Reborn, for Doom 3

about X hours ago from PC Gamer
Mod of the Week: Doom Reborn, for Doom 3

There are a number of ongoing efforts to mod older games into newer engines. Black Mesa, for instance, rebuilt much of the original Half-Life in the Source Engine, and the modders behind Skywind are painstakingly crafting Morrowind in Skyrim’s Creation Engine. With Doom Reborn, modders have been working diligently to recreate Doom and Doom II in Doom 3′s idTech4 engine. They recently released a pre-beta version, so I thought it was a good time to see how the first FPS I ever played looked with a facelift.

Memmories… like a goon-filled poison piiiiit…

Doom II represented a number of firsts for me. It was the first FPS game I ever played (I played Doom II before I played the original Doom). It was the first game I needed to create a boot disk for, just so I could run it on whatever toaster I was using as a PC back then. It was the first multiplayer game I ever played, and I recall an evening spent talking to my friend Mark on the phone, then taking the line from the phone and plugging it into my modem, then dialing up Mark, not getting a response from his modem, then replugging the line into the phone to call him again to troubleshoot (we eventually got it working, had a complete blast, then plugged our lines back into the phones so we could talk about it afterwards).

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The Sunday Papers

about X hours ago from Rock, Paper, Shotgun
The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for transcribing 20,000 words of interviews long ago recorded, but before I type my fingers into bloodied stumps, lets round up the week’s best wordythoughts about viddygames. Time sent a war photographer into The Last Of Us, which is a great idea I wish was carried out in Arma 3. None of the [...]

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Amplitude's rules for Early Access development

about X hours ago from Eurogamer
Amplitude's rules for Early Access development

There is a problem in Hollywood - and wherever expensive vessels get launched onto unpredictable seas - that you might want to call the Awkward Problem. And it is, inevitably, an awkward problem. The root of the issue is very probably the sad fact that money and taste rarely exist in the same place for very long, so whenever a big studio, say, nears the completion of a costly project, it starts to get nervous about the decisions that have been made along the way.

After that, of course, it starts to seek feedback. In principle, this is a laudable idea. The studio will organise advance screenings in shopping malls where punters are invited in and quizzed on what they're shown. And the quizzing? This is where things can become awkward. Say you're a writer or a director and you want to show the audience that your bad guy is a really bad guy. You might put a scene in your film that makes it entirely clear just how bad a guy he actually is, in fact. And, sure enough, the scene might make people feel awkward - which, remember, is exactly what it's meant to do. But when that awkwardness turns up as feedback, the context can be hard to grasp, and the suits might register nothing more than: Oh, this scene is a problem. Then they might take it out. And then the whole edifice might slowly start to crumble.

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Bastard of the Old Republic

about X hours ago from Eurogamer
Bastard of the Old Republic

Every Sunday on Eurogamer we pick a feature out of the archive that you might have missed or might enjoy reading again. This week is different. This week we are bringing together all three instalments of John Walker's amazing series, Bastard of the Old Republic, so you can enjoy it in its entirety. This was originally published in 2009 and is one of my favourite things we've ever run. Enjoy. -Tom B

There's something you need to know about me. I'm a good guy. I'm a generally decent person. I have my many faults, and certainly my large share of means to be irritating, rude and bothersome. But ultimately, it's fair to say I'm a kind, reasonable individual. I'm not the sort of person who, for instance, would usually be found mocking victims of bullying, endorsing racism or murdering victims of sexual assault. [I can vouch for this. John Walker is a man of whom I once wrote, "His heart is so big it is possible he has no other organs." - Ed]

When I play a BioWare role-playing game, my characters tend to not only lean toward the nicer side, but almost immediately start twinkling with the magical pixie dust of purity. It's embarrassing, but I just make the decisions I believe I'd really make, and end up that way.

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Gaming on the Big Screen: Optoma GT1080 projector review

about X hours ago from Eurogamer
Gaming on the Big Screen: Optoma GT1080 projector review

There was a time when the notion of a 40 or 50-inch living room display was the stuff of dreams, but now it is commonplace, delivering an immersive gameplay experience through large, pin-sharp imagery - but what if we want to go bigger and really replicate the epic, cinematic feel that many triple-A titles are striving for? We could sit closer to the display or adopt a desktop set-up to help bring us closer to the action, but this still falls short of replicating the true big-screen experience at home. HDTVs can't really deliver, but projectors can, offering up mammoth 100-inch images for the cost of a conventional living room flat-screen display.

When choosing a projector for gaming in the average living room, there are several things to look out for: low input lag, fast panel response to reduce motion smearing, and a high level of brightness to give images enough pop to work in lighter coloured environments. Throw ratio and distance are also important, as these determine how far away the projector needs to be from the screen in order to produce a large image. If you are planning to fire up massive images in a small room with only two to three metres' clearance from one end to the other at best, a short throw projector is probably the best option.

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Arcade hunting in Akiba

about X hours ago from Eurogamer
Arcade hunting in Akiba

It's everything you'd hope for. There's a dream-like projection of the Japanese arcade, where candy cabinets sit stretched out row upon row in smoky, dark rooms, sugar rush soundtracks and freshly sunk 100 yen coins chiming together to create a chirpy wall of static. In the game stations of Shinjuku and Shibuya, it's a scene that's harder to come by, tastes having moved on to the likes of Gundam Versus EX, Lords of Vermillion - a card-battling series in its third instalment that looks like a hyperactive Hearthstone - or more recent entrants like Square Enix's Gunslinger Stratos, an athletic light gun shooter with a gloriously extreme cabinet. They're excellent games, and wonderful places, but you'd be forgiven for wanting to look elsewhere to get closer to that well-worn ideal.

There used to be more traditional arcades in the heart of Tokyo, though they seem to be diminishing in number - a once worn-down arcade where the cabinets were 50 yen a play closed over a year ago, an empty facade all that's left of a former favourite - but in Akihabara they're still rich in number, and rich in cabinets stocked with countless classic games. If you're lucky enough to find yourself over there, I'd recommend two destinations - the HEY centre on the main strip, and the Try Tower that sits about five minutes walk away from Akihabara's station.

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New Advanced Warfare Screen Teases New Multiplayer Map, Prestige Emblem & Private Match Menu

about X hours ago from MP1st
New Advanced Warfare Screen Teases New Multiplayer Map, Prestige Emblem & Private Match Menu

Sledgehammer Games studio co-founder Michael Condrey posted a new Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare image on social media today teasing the game’s Private Match menu while also teasing a new multiplayer map and Prestige emblem. Condrey’s soldier carries a blinged-out riot shield and a rather intimidating helmet while prepping for a match of TDM on the map […]

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Outland switches platforms, absorbs bullets on Steam

about X hours ago from Joystiq PC
Outland switches platforms, absorbs bullets on Steam

Resogun developer Housemarque's platforming, bullet-dodging hybrid Outland will make its way to Steam on September 29. A related post on Housemarque's blog notes that in addition to Outland's campaign co-op, the port will include "a revamped checkpoint system," which should be helpful for those going against flowing, tone-changing bullet patterns for the first time.

Outland's intricate, dangerous environments first appeared on PlayStation Network and Xbox Live Arcade in April of 2011, and while Editor-In-Chief Ludwig Kietzmann wished the co-op had altered the experience in a meaningful way, his review concluded that Outland "succeeds where it counts." [Image: Ubisoft]

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Mojang drops price, doles out freebies for Scrolls tablet launch

about X hours ago from Joystiq PC
Mojang drops price, doles out freebies for Scrolls tablet launch

Scrolls, Mojang's - or is it Microsoft's? - card battle game, will see a price drop of more than 75 percent when it launches this fall, the developer announced on its blog this week. This means that the normally $21 game will drop to $5, regardless of platform. If you've already dropped a Jackson and Washington on the game, that might sound like bad news - but there are several upsides.

First, those who have already purchased the game will receive the $20 shard package, which allows players to purchase new scrolls, pre-constructed decks and player avatars, free of charge. Also, not only will the price be the same across platforms, but so will gameplay; Scrolls players on tablets will be able to compete with those on PC and Mac, as well as have their collections and progress transfer from one version to the other.

"Our current price of $21 isn't feasible for tablets," Owen Hill of Mojang wrote. "As you probably already know, games are cheap on those things. Free-to-play would be an option, but we're not keen on the way that that form of monetisation can affect gameplay." [Image: Mojang]

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Tokyo Game Show 2014 News, Previews, Trailers And More Round-Up

about X hours ago from GameInformer Feature
Tokyo Game Show 2014 News, Previews, Trailers And More Round-Up

The Tokyo Game Show isn't over yet, but that doesn't mean we can't start rounding up all of our coverage that has resulted from the show.

Below you will find everything we've published (so far) from our time at the show, organized in easy to follow sections.

As you might have assume from the name Tokyo Game Show, the show is in Japan and focuses mostly on Japanese games. Many of the games shown aren't not guaranteed to come to North America. Our TGS Localization Wishlist breaks down the ones we hope will be localized for the United States.

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Titanfall Sand Trap map rounds out IMC Rising DLC

about X hours ago from Joystiq PCJoystiq Xbox
Titanfall Sand Trap map rounds out IMC Rising DLC

The final map in Titanfall's season pass-related DLC, IMC Rising, is called Sand Trap. In a recent post on the game's official site, Respawn Entertainment Game Designer Chris Dionne gave us a general layout of the to-be-broken-in warzone.

Sand Trap features a maze of trenches surrounding a buried bunker, which is inspired by architecture found on the Fracture map, and these subterranean locales shelter pilots from Titans patrolling the ground level. They aren't all OSHA-complient pathways however - some give way to wells of fuel, which are slightly lethal for anyone clumsy enough to fall into one. With pilots facing better odds of survival while submerged in the trenches, the dunes above are typically a Titan-dominated landscape.

Like Titanfall's previous DLC packs, IMC Rising will be free for season pass holders and go for $9.99 when purchased separately. Respawn has yet to elaborate on IMC Rising's general Fall 2014 arrival window. [Image: Respawn Entertainment]

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